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BVD is common in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Updated: Jan 5


Binocular vision dysfunctions and autism spectrum disorders are two areas of study that have recently gained significant attention. While they are different in nature, there is evidence that suggests a connection between the two. In this article, we will explore the relationship between binocular vision dysfunctions and autism spectrum disorders, and the impact this connection may have on individuals who are diagnosed with either condition.


Binocular vision dysfunctions refer to a group of conditions that affect the way a person perceives depth and spatial relationships between objects. This can result in difficulties with eye coordination and the ability to focus on objects that are close up or far away. Common symptoms of binocular vision dysfunctions include eye strain, headaches, and difficulty with tasks that require depth perception, such as playing sports or reading. Appropriate treatments for binocular vision dysfunctions include prescription prism glasses and personalized vision therapy.


Autism spectrum disorders, on the other hand, are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that are characterized by difficulties with social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavior patterns. While the exact cause of autism is not known, there is evidence that suggests that it may be a result of genetic, environmental, and neurological factors.

Recently, researchers have found evidence that suggests that there may be a connection between binocular vision dysfunctions and autism spectrum disorders. A study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders in 2018 found that children with autism spectrum disorders were more likely to have binocular vision dysfunctions than typically developing children. The study also found that children with autism who had binocular vision dysfunctions showed increased difficulties with tasks that required spatial awareness and depth perception.


Another study, published in the Journal of Vision in 2019, found that children with autism spectrum disorders had reduced levels of binocular rivalry, which is a phenomenon that occurs when the brain switches back and forth between the images from each eye. This reduction in binocular rivalry was associated with decreased visual attention and impaired spatial perception.


While more research is needed to fully understand the connection between binocular vision dysfunctions and autism spectrum disorders, these studies suggest that individuals with autism may be more likely to experience difficulties with depth perception and spatial awareness. This connection may also have implications for the development of effective treatments for autism.


If you are experiencing visual symptoms that are causing difficulty in daily life, it is important to see an optometrist that has experience with diagnosing binocular vision dysfunctions and feels comfortable with prescribing prism glasses or personalized vision therapy.


If you're struggling to locate a neuro-visual optometrist in your region, consider arranging a virtual consultation with Dr. David Antonyan, O.D. through the website https://www.vividvisionsoptometry.com/. Dr. Antonyan, O.D. can assist you in finding local eye care professionals and initiating the appropriate treatment plan for your recovery journey. For those residing in the Los Angeles or Valencia area, you can also book an in-office appointment directly with Dr. David Antonyan, O.D. by dialing (661)310-0603 or visiting https://www.vividvisionsoptometry.com/appointments. Dr. Antonyan, O.D. possesses the expertise needed to prescribe precise prismatic corrections, which can significantly alleviate symptoms arising from binocular vision dysfunctions, ultimately transforming your quality of life.


References:

  1. Legate, N., & Savage, J. (2018). Binocular vision in children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 48(1), 85-96.

  2. Werth, D. M., Kale, A., & Wilson, H. R. (2019). Reduced binocular rivalry in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Vision, 19(11), 12.

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